A First for Everything…   Leave a comment

18 September 2017

We had a first-time experience this past weekend.  I guess there’s a first time for everything if you live long enough, and on a scale of one to ten this was not an eleven, but neither Lynn nor I had experienced it before. We had a bat in the house.  It was Friday night. We had just gotten back from a comfort-food dinner (open-faced turkey sandwiches with mashed and veg) at Moody’s Diner 13 miles north of our house (in Waldoboro), and had settled in front of the TV for our usual evening ritual, when we got buzzed by a bat… in the living room.

While Lynn called for her hat from the couch, I stood by the stairs (intending to play “goalie” and keep the bat on the first floor) and researched solutions on my phone.

Basically, there seemed to be four approaches; catch it with a butterfly net (nix that one, no butterfly net available), direct it to an open door or window (if you can), catch it in a blanket (risking injury to the fragile-boned creature), or keep it flying until its exhausted and collapses – then plop a bowl over it, slide cardboard under the bowl, carry the whole rig outside and release it back into the wild.  Option one (butterfly net) was a non-starter, so we opted for option two (direct it to an open door).  Once we had hung a curtain-like arrangement in the stairway in an attempt to keep the unwanted visitor downstairs, I opened the deck door and tried to herd it towards the open door with a straw broom. It must have been funny to watch.  I kept it flying but it was not wanting to be herded anywhere.  Does the phrase “Brownian Motion” ring a bell?

Neither of us were fond of option three (throw a blanket on it), and since the difference between option two (herd it) and option four (tucker it out) seemed insignificant at this point, we closed the deck door (would the ultra-sonic ruckus attract other bats??) and I just kept it flying in the hopes that it would run out of steam.  Sure enough, after what seemed like hours (but was probably only 10-15 minutes) of waving the broom at the bat, it collapsed on the floor, exhausted.  I quickly grabbed a plastic bowl from the cabinet and plopped it down on the floor, over the bat.  There was a few seconds of bat-squawks (I think I was being cursed in bat-talk) but the invader had been corralled.  I found a sufficiently-large piece of cardboard in the cellar, slid it gently under the bowl (a few more bat-curses were heard), carried the whole shebang outside and released the bat on the deck.

It tried to fly through the balusters of the railing, and failing that, it sat down on the deck to catch it’s breath.  I retreated to the inside of the house. We congratulated ourselves on a successful catch-and-release, and settled down to finally watch some TV.  …And of course during the TV show I began thinking about how bat-boy got into the house, and if there were any more hiding above us……  !!

Mice are much easier to deal with… SNAP!

bat30pct

 

Posted 18 September 2017 by Gene Vogt in Uncategorized

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