Archive for the ‘Newcastle’ Category

“All God’s Critters Got a Place in the House!” *   1 comment

* with apologies to Bill Staines

17 June 2018

Baby SquirrelBack a couple of visits ago, we found a baby squirrel, dead, in the wastebasket by Lynn’s side of the bed when we first arrived at the Ballot Box for the weekend. To us that meant a mother squirrel had gotten in and had her babies somewhere in the house. We don’t have an attic in this house so we were a bit puzzled about where the nest might be. According to some quick research, squirrels have 3-4 offspring in a brood, so there might be more. We were also a bit confused about *how* they might have gotten in. We have occasional trouble with Meadow Voles (a.k.a. American field mice) as the fall turns to winter, but mousetraps seem to be able to stem any possible tide of Microtus pennsylvanicus.

Our next visit was for a week-long stay in conjunction with the Memorial Day holiday. We throw a “Start of Summer” party for Lynn’s side of the family each year on the Sunday before the holiday, and this was the week. We got up on the Thursday before and began plans and preparations for the party. The next morning after Lynn had taken her shower, she went back to the bedroom from the bathroom (Au Naturale, of course) and grabbed a big canvas LLBean Tote in the hall that we often use as an overflow suitcase. She went into the bedroom and plopped the bag down on the padded hassock/bench in front of the window, and out jumped another juvenile squirrel that started running around the bedroom – with Lynn as naked as a jaybird. Needless to say she was a bit Victor Mouse Trapstartled and perplexed. So was Lynn! The squirrel retreated to under a half-height folding bookcase full of shoes in the corner, and Lynn got dressed quicker than she ever had before, giving the bookcase a wide berth! We moved the bookcase to see if he was still there, but the squirrel had apparently retreated from that hiding place to a different one. We set out a couple of mousetraps in the upstairs hall soon after that episode.

That night we heard some rustling and rummaging around upstairs while we were watching TV, and then a “SNAP!” and a wailing ruckus from upstairs, so I went up to investigate and a baby squirrel – we assumed THE baby squirrel – was thrashing around in the hallway. It was a bit too big for the mousetrap but still was caught by the leg. I tried to put a wastebasket over it but as I approached it got loose and scurried into the bedroom, again under the bookcase. We slowly moved away all the stuff in the corner near the bookcase, and then Lynn stood with a blanket poised to throw and I moved the bookcase to reveal the wounded squirrel. Lynn threw the blanket over the squirrel and I tried to stun it under the blanket to keep it from escaping as we tried to bundle it up in the blanket and take it outside. We tossed the blanket containing the squirrel into a trashcan and carried it outside. When I unfurled the blanket the squirrel fell out, dead. That was two…

During the rest of the week (after the party) I noticed mouse movement along the top of the foundation, emanating from one specific corner of the house, while I sat at my desk in the cellar working at my computer, so I figured that the critters had found a way in at that corner of the foundation, up under the trim-boards that box in each corner of the house and run up the side of the house to the roof. I went out to that corner during the daylight hours (ostensibly while the critters were out and about) and jammed a bunch of steel wool up into that trim-board corner to block re-entry with something that can’t be chewed.

The next trip up (two weeks later) we found a dead mouse in the upstairs bathroom wastebasket (they sometimes fall in and can’t get out, not unusual), but there was stuff askew and knocked around all over the house; a walking stick had been tipped over by the door, the umbrella in the corner of the downstairs bathroom was on the floor, a vase had been knocked off the kitchen counter, a greeting card had been knocked off the hutch, and the upstairs bathroom had been “ransacked,” the cup of toothbrushes knocked on the floor, all the accouterments in the shower (soap, shampoo bottles, a pitcher for rinsing the shower after a shower, facecloths, etc.) had been knocked off their shelves and into the tub. So we started investigating… and also found a hole had been chewed in the inside fiberglass screen on one of the closed casement windows in our bedroom. We considered booking a room in a B&B for the night (we had arrived ~9 pm and it was getting late) but none of the B&Bs in the area were taking guests yet. So we went to bed, wondering if a squirrel was going to attack us as we slept.

Nothing happened during the night, and the next day (Friday) we started a deeper search of the upstairs. Eventually Lynn found a “lump” under the guest bed bed-covers so we carefully cleared everything off the bed and slowly peeled off the puff… to reveal the third baby squirrel… dead. Apparently there was still a baby squirrel IN the house when I plugged the entry/exit with steel wool, and it made a mess of the bathroom and other parts of the house looking for food and water and another way out. It finally died of starvation after tucking itself into bed in the guest bed. We bundled the mattress cover and the puff (with the squirrel carcass) into a trash bag and tossed it in the trash at the dump/transfer station, and peeled off the foam egg-crates that were on the bed under the mattress pad and put them out on the deck to get aired out or more likely pitched another day.

havahartOn the outside chance there’s yet another one still in the house we set a “small squirrel” hav-a-hart trap in the upstairs hallway when we left, to be checked when we return. Remember, our research revealed that squirrels broods are 3-4 in size… we found three…

Never a dull moment in the woods of Maine!

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Posted 18 June 2018 by Gene Vogt in Home Ownership, Maine, Newcastle, The Ballot Box

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Welcoming Another Summer, and Beginning to Plan for the Endless Vacation…   Leave a comment

14 June 2017

IMG_7346The Memorial Day holiday offered a perfect excuse to head to the Ballot Box for nine (should have been ten) days. We celebrated the start to another summer season, with our eighth annual Memorial Day Weekend Lobster-Fest on Sunday for Lynn’s side of the family. ‘Twas a smaller crowd than in some past years, but what we were lacking in numbers we make up for in festivity. We had local beer (growlers and bottles) and wine and mimosas and seltzer, 3 dozen Glidden Point Select Oysters (fresh-shucked by yours truly, the amateur shucker) garnished with a choice of fresh lemon juice or Tabasco™ sauce or some locally-distilled horseradish-infused vodka, fruit salad, veggie salad, lobsters, Scottish salmon, hanger steak (for the seafood-averse), and a myriad of desserts. The weather, which had been borderline miserable for the days before, came through splendiferously for the actual day – warm (but not too warm), sunny, and light breezes to keep the bugs mostly at bay.  Pre-party photos (I forgot to take pictures during the party!) can be viewed here.

IMG_20170530_090715099_HDRWe all mourned the loss of our fencepost-mounted swallow-house, which was ripped off the mount the night before the party and raided – the eggs were destroyed. Mr. & Mrs.  Swallow were in shock and hung around the now-vacant fencepost for the rest of the week, looking forlorn. Images of 2014’s fledge-tending can be viewed here.

Our planned visit during the week with long-time friends who live year-round on Little-Sebago Lake in Gray ME was postponed when Lynn found an embedded deer tick on her body the day of the scheduled visit. We decided to visit a walk-in clinic instead and get the tick professionally removed. She got prescribed a dose of Doxycycline for Lyme Disease prevention but we missed a day visiting friends [Editor’s followup: no symptoms!]. We’ll visit another time; we know where they live! [Editor’s followup: and we did!]

The other notable activity during the week was the start of our getting serious about how we want to live up in Maine once retirement (aka The Endless Vacation) finally commences. We’ve had the Ballot Box as a vacation home for eight years now, with lots of weekend visits, some week-long visits, and a few extended (weeks into months) times with Lynn being in-residence. What we’ve come to realize is that the Ballot Box is a bit small (about 950 sq. ft.) for full-time year-round residence for the two of us. We need a bit more space (we both have a lot of toys). Not a lot, but more than what’s here now, so we’ve started exploring possible solutions to the dilemma, which include renovations, additions, or even replacement. We’ve started making lists of nice-to-haves and necessities, and we’re setting up appointments with architects and builders to pick their brains on what’s possible and practical. Nothing concrete yet, we’re in sponge-mode and trying to figure out what we really need. We crossed the swimming pool off the list right away! 😉

Posted 14 June 2017 by Gene Vogt in Maine, Newcastle, Summer, The Ballot Box

Winter Finally Arrived… WHAM!   Leave a comment

5 March 2017

2017-02-17_07-41-19-50pct20x_It was an uneventful start to the new year until recently.  Light flurries, not much snow, so little in fact that I kept forgetting to attach the snow measurement stake to the fence post so we could gauge the approximate snow depth using the webcam image.  Finally attached it on the 15th of January (first appearing on the next day’s noon snap archive) – still mostly bare ground.

Got dustings that hung around for a day or two until the 7th of February, when we got about 6 inches that prompted a visit from my plow man. From then it snowed 6-8 inches every few days so that by the time we showed up on the evening of the 16th of February there was close to 2 feet of snow on open ground. My plow guy kept up with it all (six visits over eight days), but I didn’t contract with him to shovel a path to the door, so that was my job upon arrival… in the dark.

The snow density was significant. It didn’t fall light and fluffy, there was some moisture in it.  Then the temperature must’ve fallen because the snow ended up being a bit stiff.  The best technique for shoveling was to cut the snow into shovel-sized blocks first, then shovel the cut blocks off to the side.  The snow was deeper than a shovel-thrust, so I cut two levels of courses each time.  It took a while, but the blocks were stable so the shoveling only required lifting, not lifting and balancing.

The next morning was a workday for me (Friday telecommuting – thank goodness for the internet!), but about 6:45am there was a knock on the door and the propane delivery guy was there, saying the snow was too deep to drag the propane hose around the back of the house to fill the tank.  I asked if he could come back tomorrow morning and I would shovel a path around the back of the house for him by then. So every couple of hours I would take a break from the computer and go out to shovel more igloo blocks out of the snow in a path around the back of the house.  Lynn took care of shoveling off the deck so we could refill the bird feeders. It was a bit of work to hand-shovel the paths, but I know how to shovel with my legs instead of my back and I took frequent breaks (I had telecommuting work to do as well), so it ended up ALMOST being enjoyable – out in the bright cold air, getting exercise!  The propane guy delivered without a problem the next (Saturday) morning. A full set of pictures (it was pretty in spite of the work) can be viewed here.

Once we left and headed back south, Mother Nature teased the mid-coast area with 3-4 days of late-Spring-like weather (sunny, temperature hitting 65°F), so the ground is back to being mostly bare.  Perhaps winter is over, but one can never be sure.  I’ll put the shovels away sometime in May…

Posted 5 March 2017 by Gene Vogt in Maine, Newcastle, The Ballot Box, Winter

Ten Days of Relaxation…   Leave a comment

5 JUNE 2016

 We wrapped up ten straight days at the Ballot Box, and felt a bit melancholy about heading back south. All good things must come to an end, I guess.  Sigh!  The good news is that we’ll be back for occasional weekends throughout the summer and fall (and winter and spring, for that matter!).

We headed north a week ago Thursday (26 May) afternoon.  I left work a bit early to run the lawn mower around the yard before departing for a week-plus. Mulch-mowing is much faster than bagging as long as the grass isn’t too long (it was right at the edge of being too long, but…). I got the whole lawn mowed in a tad over an hour, mowing non-stop.

We got on the road a little after 4:00 pm. The ride up was amazingly easy; there was traffic, but nowhere near as bad as we suspected for the start of the Memorial Day weekend. We slipped off Route 95 at exit 7 in Maine (“The Yorks, Ogunquit”) just before the tolls to look for some place to stop for dinner and ended up at Wild Willy’s Burgers on Route 1 in York ME.  ‘Twas our first time there and a good find.  Turns out it’s a small chain with five locations; York ME, Rochester NH, and Worcester, Watertown, and Quincy MA. Very good burgers, definitely a place we’ll return to.  Back on the highway, we got to the Ballot Box at 8:31 pm (according to the time-stamp on the webcam-captured image), unpacked the car, aired out the house (a bit stuffy from being closed up), and settled in for some TV – our routine lately is to watch various episodes of British mystery shows (Midsomer Murders, Poirot, Vera, Crossing Lines, Wallander, etc.) on Netflix™ or Amazon Prime™ or Acorn™ via Roku™.

Friday, Saturday, and Sunday morning was spent preparing for our seventh annual Family Lobster Feed™, held on the Sunday before Memorial Day each May.  We had fifteen guests this year – Audrey & Todd, Megan & Dan, Marcia & Tom, Jan & Joyce, Gail & Cam, Kristine, Dylan, Mark, and of course Gene & Lynn. We provided Damariscotta River oysters on the half-shell and fresh tuna sashimi for appetizers, local Maine lobsters, grilled Faroe Island salmon, grilled rib-eye steaks for the seafood-haters for the main meal, and growlers of Oxbow beer (Farmhouse Pale Ale and Freestyle 35 – a dry-hopped German-style pilsner) to wash it all down.  Guests brought everything from work-of-art salad, spicy shrimp appetizers, wine, desserts, and other sundries. A fine time was had by all.  We managed to snap a few photos during the party, but we were a bit busy otherwise!

IMG_2018a 20pctMonday – Memorial Day – was a lazy day after the party. We mostly puttered with cleaning up and putting things away.  I had intentionally over-bought on the lobsters so we would have leftovers for lobster rolls and other things, and I made the most of it with a lobster “triple play”; a lobster omelet for breakfast, a lobster roll for lunch, and one-and-a-half lobster rolls for dinner!

Tuesday I started a long-discussed (and likely to be a long-in-process) yard project – thinning and clearing the young stand of trees on the street-side of the house into a contemplative birch grove.  There are lots of young trees over there, some poplar, some white pine, some unidentified, but there is a significant number of white birches in there as well.  We want to clear out all but the birches, lay down some walking paths, place a few benches at various locations, and make it a peaceful place for restful contemplation.  This will be a long-duration project for sure, but it becomes usable fairly quickly while the work is in progress, so we should be able to start enjoying it fairly soon.  I took down a few trees with my almost-a-toy $65 Homelite chainsaw (until the original chain finally wore out – it was heavily-used this spring) and also ordered a lever-based pry bar device called an UpRooter for pulling up small-to-medium saplings to clear out an area. I’ll report back on how it works when I get my hands on it and try it out.  Steak and salmon leftovers from the Sunday party were on the menu for dinner.

Lynn and I had made arrangements last week to meet up with old friends Martha and Gary at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens on Wednesday (Lynn and I are contributing members so we each get free admission and each of us gets to bring a guest in free as well, whenever we go). Martha was Lynn’s maid of honor at our wedding, oh so many years ago.  Wednesday turned out to be a gem of a day for garden-gazing… IMG_2087-©-20pct20xbright sun, no humidity, low 70s, light breeze!  We first ate lunch in the café overlooking the main lawn and central gardens at the visitor’s center, then we headed out.  Naturally, I slung my camera bag over my shoulder (didn’t need both flashes so I left one home).  Look what I found in the woods!

Lynn and I treated ourselves to breakfast out Thursday morning; we went to Crissy’s Breakfast and Coffee Bar in Damariscotta. The Eggs Benedict with hash-browns and a side of bacon spoke to us both.  It was another nice day so we worked some more out in the yard and set the first of many granite 5x5x9 edging blocks along the peony garden at the front of the house.  We’ll use the same kind of blocks to edge all the gardens and the to-be-built walkway from the driveway to the small deck at the door, eventually.

Friday ended up being a pretty nice day, weather-wise, so we puttered out in the yard some more.  We got an invitation to dinner and Parcheesi lessons at friends David and Betty Lu’s house in Damariscotta Mills.  Betty Lu made a delicious curry-based shrimp over rice dish for dinner – we brought a growler of Oxbow’s Freestyle 35 to contribute.

Saturday was another half-speed day (isn’t that what vacations are for?).  We lolled around in the morning, then I went out and got some mulch for the gardens in two 17-gallon muck-buckets (to be spread on a future weekend visit), grabbed a couple of Subway™ sandwiches for lunch, and we continued our yard-puttering and deck-flowers-puttering.  In the afternoon I went out and bought picked lobster meat and we treated ourselves to lobster rolls for our last dinner at the house this vacation.

Sunday was our last day on vacation.  We packed up and headed out to meet up with Jan and Joyce for lunch and a visit to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art which is celebrating the acquisition of a supposedly hauntingly lovely mummy portrait, made 2,000 years ago somewhere on the Nile River.

Posted 5 June 2016 by Gene Vogt in Maine, Newcastle, Summer, The Ballot Box

A Quiet and Relaxing Turn of the Calendar…   Leave a comment

14 JANUARY 2016

Another “last week of the year” spent at our getaway in the meadow by the brook – our favorite way to ring in a new year.

As is our pattern and preference, Lynn and I spent Christmas down south with the family, and headed north the day after.  Christmas Eve was spent at Megan & Dan’s house in Lowell with the usual crowd (Dan’s parents Paul and Susan, sister Anna and her husband James, Audrey and Todd), and with new invitees this year; Gail and Cam came down from NH, Kris came down from Maine, Dylan came up on the train from Boston, and Megan and Dan’s friends Jessica, Ashley, Jeremiah, Brianna, Morgan, and Morgan Jr. joined us for a relaxing and enjoyable evening.  Good food, good drink, good company, good conversation!

Gail and Cam came back to the TreeHouse with us to stay overnight, while Kris and Dylan bunked out at Megan and Dan’s, and we all re-convened at our southern house for Christmas morning  stockings, breakfast, and under-tree presents.  The meal was a feast of breakfast pies (two quiches and a French-toast casserole) and our traditional Christmas breakfast treat of bagels and cream cheese with Nova Lox – and red onion for those that wanted it.  The overnight visitors departed for homes about when the girls and spouse/fiancée departed for in-laws/future-in-laws.  Later in the day we wandered down the street to my sister’s house for a while, delivering the grand-nieces’ and grand-nephews’ presents, then back to the house for a light supper.

Saturday morning we packed the car for eight days in Maine and aimed the CX-5 north.  Lunch at the Kennebunk exit rest area (mile marker 24) broke up the drive nicely (we – or at least I – have a soft spot in our palate for Popeye’s Fried Chicken, especially the biscuits). We stopped at the Shaw’s supermarket in Wiscasset for a first round of provisions (milk, eggs, salmon and a veggie for dinner, etc.), and got to the Ballot Box around 4:30 pm.  The salmon we bought was fresh farm-raised, and I grilled it in my usual way (grilled on very high heat, basting frequently with seasoned lemon-butter), but it just wasn’t as good as our usual Faroe Island salmon that we get from the fish market at the bridge in Damariscotta, but of course not as expensive, either!  That meant we’d have to be sure to do another slab of the good stuff during the week, which we did!

The rest of the week was relaxing and low-key.  We cooked all our meals at home until the last few days, listened to a lot of music, read books, watched TV, I did some tele-work, Lynn did a lot of quilting, I changed all the smoke-detector batteries on New Years’ Day (the replaced batteries had an installed-on date of March 2013 – shame on me!!), I worked on getting the daily noon snap image capture from the webcam working for the new exterior webcam rather than the window webcam, and then rewrote the display page to pull the image from the appropriate web site subdirectory based on the date (pre-2016, pull from the old webcam archive; 2016-and-beyond, pull from the new webcam archive).  I love JavaScript!

Thursday (New Year’s Eve) we met Jan and Joyce at Mae’s Café in Bath for lunch, stopped afterwards at the Reny’s in Bath to look for some specific items the Reny’s in Damariscotta didn’t have, discovered that the quilt shop in Bath appears to have vanished, and headed back to the Ballot Box to mix up our traditional New Year’s Eve clam dip (a can of chopped clams, a brick of Philly Cream Cheese, Worcestershire Sauce and salt to taste), and try to stay awake until midnight.  Ordinarily we would also watch our 20+ year old recording of Dinner For One, but we decided to loan our DVD copy to Jan and Joyce so they could experience it, so we watched a movie on Netflix and a PBS special, then flipped channels between the ball dropping and other stuff while eating chips and clam dip.

New Year’s Day was also pleasantly quiet.  We initially headed for Crissy’s Breakfast and Coffee Bar in Damariscotta for lunch, but they were closed (as were most shops in downtown Damariscotta) so we headed to Sarah’s Café in Wiscasset to enjoy their soup and bread bar – haddock chowder for Lynn, beefy chili for Gene.  Back to the house for more relaxing activities, then off to the Newcastle Publick House for a delightful New Year’s dinner – petite beef wellington to share as an appetizer, seafood pasta for Lynn, lamb rack chops for Gene, all from the daily specials menu.

Saturday was also quiet and relaxing. I got a second “noon-time web-snap” from the exterior webcam, which made me feel a bit more confident that I had cracked the code on how to capture and archive a noon-time snap from the hi-res exterior webcam to the web site.  I had had it working since 2 July 2011 on the low-res indoor webcam that looks out the front window over the front lawn and driveway, and I’ve made rapid-snap year-long videos of that view to watch a year go by in about 4 minutes (set to music, of course), but I wanted to transition over to the hi-res webcam on the first of the year; Dec. 31, 2015 and earlier would be low-res, Jan 1, 2016 and later would be hi-res.  To do that cleanly I needed to overlap for a short period of time; dual noon-time snaps, one from each webcam.  I cut it a little closer than I wanted to with the new webcam, getting it snapping at (or about) noon with just 2 days to spare.

Sunday we reluctantly packed up and headed south; our 8-day-escape was over.  BUT… we get to go back up 15-18 January because I get MLK Day off!

Posted 14 January 2016 by Gene Vogt in General, Maine, Newcastle, The Ballot Box, Winter

Busy Spring and Summer…   Leave a comment

16 JULY 2015

No blog entries since the end of March – I’ve been derelict in my duties!  We haven’t been up to the Ballot Box much this spring and summer.  After our end-of-March visit we didn’t make it back up until 24-26 April.  The month of May gave us a lot of days in Maine as we spent the weekend of 15-17 May and the WEEK of 22-30 May, which included Memorial Day and our 6th annual Memorial Day Weekend Summer Kickoff Lobster Feed for Lynn’s side of the family. The party was a bit smaller than in other years as both our girls and their beaus had to miss the festivities.  I volunteered to eat their lobsters!  I also installed and wired a new weather-proof hi-def power-over-Ethernet (PoE) webcam under the front eaves of the house to replace the webcam we’ve had in the front window for over four years.  Unfortunately the webcam was weather-proof but the RJ-45 Ethernet connection – which carries network signal and power in a PoE installation – was not. The camera connector shorted out in a rainstorm so I dismounted it and sent it back to the manufacturer for repair.  As of today it’s still not back so we’re back to depending on the front window webcam for visibility until the repaired camera returns.  It will get some waterproof tape applied when it’s reinstalled.

Only one trip north in June (17-21), but it was an emotional visit.  As many of you know, Lynn is an active quilter and actually teaches quilting to beginners occasionally.  She belongs to two quilt guilds, one in MA and one in ME, and soon after Lynn’s automobile accident one of her Maine quilt buddies (Meredith) contacted me to collect email addresses of Lynn’s quilter-friends in MA and elsewhere so she could contact them to see if anyone would be willing to make a quilt block (quilters, you know what that is) to be sewn into a commemorative thank-you quilt to be given to the Rockport Volunteer Fire and Rescue Squad (the people who rescued Lynn after the crash).  Meredith collected numerous blocks from thirteen quilters living in at least four states.  She received enough blocks to make two full quilts plus two throw pillows to go on the couch in the fire department lounge/break room.  Lynn is actually alive today because an off-duty Rockland policeman and volunteer Rockport fireman and EMT (one man, two jobs) named Billy Smith, and his RN wife.  He and his wife came upon the accident just after it happened (they were heading out to dinner at a local restaurant that night).  Billy found Lynn unconscious and not breathing.  He cleared her air passageway and sat behind her in the wrecked car, holding her head up so she could breathe until the full complement of the rescue crew arrived to attend to Lynn, cut her out of the car, and take her to the local emergency room.  Meredith arranged with Rockport Fire Chief Jason Peasley to present the quilts at the department’s June meeting on the afternoon of the 18th. This link leads to the pictures from the presentation of the quilts (click on any small picture to bring up the larger version of the picture along with the description and Exif photo details below the picture; hover to the right of the picture to make a right-arrow appear, and click it to advance to the next picture).

We spent an extra day at the BB for the July 4th holiday weekend, heading up on the Wednesday before instead of Thursday (Friday was the holiday for me).  Audrey and fiancé Todd joined us on Thursday and we all gathered at Lynn’s sister Jan and Joyce’s place in Brunswick for a holiday cookout.  A nice way to spend our 41st anniversary.

That’s pretty much it for the Ballot Box visits in the 3+ months since the last blog entry.  We’re off to Montana the end of July for a family wedding, then we’ll attempt to resume our regular schedule of every-other-weekend in Maine.

Posted 16 July 2015 by Gene Vogt in Maine, Newcastle, Summer, The Ballot Box

All’s Well at the Ballot Box…   Leave a comment

10 FEBRUARY 2015

This has been a winter like no other for a number of reasons – a long stretch (until the end of January) with very cold temperatures but very LITTLE snow; then more snow in a 7-day stretch than the Boston area has EVER seen since snowfall has been recorded, and about 6 feet has fallen over a 30-day period, beating the previous record of 58.5 inches, which was set in 1978.  And mid-coast Maine has endured the same pattern, though because of Lynn’s auto accident and recovery (which is progressing, thank goodness) neither of us has been up to the Ballot Box since the morning of the accident for Lynn and a few days after the accident for me.  Because of the storm in Maine November 2-4, the Ballot Box was without power for about five days, and lost power a couple of times in the weeks after (I know when the power goes out because both webcams stop transmitting images to the web site).  There was no power at the house while I was up there collecting essentials for Lynn, so I did my retrievals with a flashlight, and did what I could to prep the house for a possibly long period of time with no occupants.  We have not done a hard winterization of the house in the past because we would head up every two or three weeks for a long weekend and go up for the entire week (and then some) between Christmas and New Year’s.  We leave the heat on low (set at 46°F), turn the well pump and the hot water heater off, drain the pipes and empty the toilet tanks, but we don’t drain the hot water heater or put anti-freeze in the toilets and traps which would be necessary to endure a hard freeze.  This year has been different.  I left it as we usually do in case we or the kids wanted to use the house, but no-one did.

We’ve not been back up yet since the accident, but we had two disconcerting episodes with our propane delivery this winter (ran out twice, not sure why and wasn’t sure if any cold-related damage was done).  We recently adjusted our delivery to every two weeks during the winter, but I was getting anxious about why we ran out at all (was there a leak in the line?) and whether there was any damage, so I headed up this past Friday afternoon by myself – initially intending to stay the weekend but planning on leaving early if the new storm that was a possibility became more of a probability.  All was well at the house; nothing froze, everything was working except the light bulbs in the exterior light fixture by the door were all burned out (must’ve been on when I was up there during the power failure so I didn’t think to turn them off… they were probably on for three months straight!) and the webcam that aims out the deck door at the bird feeders has had a nervous breakdown and keeps cycling on and off so I unplugged it.

The threatening storm did become a likely storm, so I headed back Saturday afternoon to avoid driving 3+ hours Sunday in a snowstorm, but it was gorgeous and sunny Saturday morning so I took a walk along the driveway and shoveled footpaths taking some pictures

Posted 10 February 2015 by Gene Vogt in Maine, Newcastle, The Ballot Box, Winter